Tuesday, 31 March 2015

job posting: ACAD Visiting Artist, Ceramics

Tracking Code
1415-DE-FT-30
Job Description
The Alberta College of Art + Design (ACAD) is committed to an academic studio-based education for students in fine art, design, craft and digital media. The result is a rigorous studio program, which produces critical thinkers, creative problem solvers, and artists with well-defined practices. ACAD is a leading centre for education and research; a catalyst for creative inquiry and cultural development. We engage the world and create possibilities.

Calgary, the cultural capital of Canada for 2012, is situated at the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. ACAD, an integral part of Canada, Alberta and Calgary’s cultural community, offers four year bachelor’s programs and is developing our first graduate program. The College is developing an exciting long term vision that reaffirms its educational mission within an arts and cultural context where design and creativity are keys to the cultural prosperity agenda.

The Alberta College of Art + Design (ACAD) welcomes applications for the following position commencing in the fall semester of the 2015-2016 academic year:

The Role

This is a nine (9) month appointment over two (2) terms commencing August 20, 2015 to May 31, 2016.

To complement existing instructional resources, this position will instruct four (4) six (6) hour-long studio courses at all levels of the undergraduate BFA in Ceramics program. Salary will be commensurate with experience and education, and will be as per our current salary schedule for Sessional Faculty. In addition, the successful candidate will receive a stipend of $16,000.00 towards research and studio practice and will be required to report and present on research activities as well as mount an exhibition of their studio practice and research at the college.

Qualifications:

The successful candidate will have an MFA or an equivalent degree or combination of education and professional experience in ceramics, previous teaching experience, a professional exhibition record as a ceramist, excellent technical skills and a wide knowledge of all aspects of the discipline, with a particular regard for the international ceramics profession. Applicants with a studio practice and teaching experience in sculptural/experimental /interdisciplinary approaches to ceramics are particularly sought for this academic year.

The successful candidate will be community-oriented; comfortable interacting with students, faculty, artists, and the public; and demonstrate a balanced approach between research, practice, and pedagogy. The incumbent will be expected to participate in Ceramics program activities and administrative workload.

Please submit applications electronically by April 10, 2015 via our careers page at https://acadcareers.silkroad.com/. Only applications submitted electronically will be considered.

Submission instructions:

Applications should consist of a single PDF document including: a letter of application; current curriculum vitae; artist statements outlining philosophies and practices regarding teaching and studio practice; a digital portfolio of your recent studio work containing twenty (20) images accompanied by a corresponding numbered list including titles, medium and size; a statement on your proposed research topic (topics can include explorations in creative practice, technical process, content development, etc.); and the names and contact information for three (3) professional references.

Further information about the College and this position is available on our website at www.acad.ca. ACAD is an equal opportunity employer and is strongly committed to fostering diversity within our community. We welcome those who would contribute to the further diversification of the College. We encourage expressions of interest from all qualified applicants for consideration for this or other suitable vacancies although applications from Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority.

The collection of personal information is for the purpose of determining eligibility and suitability for employment as authorized by the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (FOIP) Act, section 33(c). If you have any questions about the collection of your information, please contact Human Resources at hr@acad.ca.

Please note that only applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.
Job Location
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Position Type
Temporary 
 
APPLY HERE

technical tuesday: An Easy Way to Get the Pulled Handle Look | SANDI PIERANTOZZI



via Ceramic Arts Daily

http://sandiandneil.com

Monday, 30 March 2015

call for entry: Workhouse Clay National

August 1 - Sept 13, 2015 - Lorton, Virginia 
 

Application Deadline: 
May 6, 2015
Application Fee: $30
The Workhouse Arts Center (WAF) is proud to announce a call for entries for its 5
th Annual Workhouse Clay National Ceramics Exhibition 2015. This 5
th Annual Workhouse Clay National Ceramics Exhibition is an "Open Call" for functional and/or sculptural ceramic artworks.
 
Workhouse Arts Center is excited to continue promoting the breadth of contemporary ceramic artwork being created throughout the USA.

All works must be primarily ceramic. Mixed media works will be accepted only if ceramic materials are the primary media. The juror will make final determinations.

monday morning eye candy: Bridget Bodenham





bridgetbodenham.com.au

free streamed live workshop - ON NOW with Tara Wilson, Lorna Meaden, and Julia Galloway!

The Ceramics Club will be hosting a 2-Day ceramic art workshop on Monday, March 30th and Tuesday, March 31st, 2015.

This 2- day ceramics workshop will be held at the Montgomery County Community College – Central Campus, also streaming live nationally/internationally.  The demonstrations will feature three nationally respected artist potters, Julia Galloway (Missoula, Montana), Lorna Meaden (Durango, Colorado) and Tara Wilson (Helena, Montana).
In addition, the workshop will feature Artstream Gallery and its 2015 Spring Tour.

Artstream 2015 Spring Tour
The Artstream Nomadic Gallery is a travelling exhibition space housed in a restored 1967 Airstream trailer.  Based in Carbondale, CO, over the past 14 years it has been exhibited in more than 150 location, from Los Angeles to New York, Houston to Minneapolis, putting contemporary ceramic art on the street.  The 2015 “Spring Tour” features work by 26 national recognized and emerging studio potters.  The work ranges the spectrum of aesthetics and techniques found in contemporary ceramics. 

www.mc3.edu/component/content/article/215-areas-of-study/arts-humanities/art/8874-ceramic-art-ws

Saturday, 28 March 2015

emerging artist: Kyle Triplett





kyletriplett.com

ACAD now offering Master of Fine Arts in Craft Media - Apply NOW!

Master of Fine Arts in Craft Media 

Pursue your MFA at the intersection of contemporary craft discourse and professional practice.
ACAD’s Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Craft Media is a cross-disciplinary degree that facilitates high-level creative research in the context of emerging craft discourses.

Participants are provided with an immersive opportunity to experiment with materials and engage with ideas and will be challenged to push the boundaries of what is possible in the generation and application of original knowledge.

The Research and Graduate Studies Office (RGSO) will be pleased to respond to specific inquiries via graduatestudies@acad.ca.

http://www.acad.ca/mfa.html

Wednesday, 25 March 2015

call for entry: Medalta International Juried Exhibition



 It’s that time of year again, our third annual call for entry for the Medalta International Exhibition.
We are still switching up the theme each year to keep things fresh... it started with cups… then spoons … this year’s theme is an ode to tools!

Last year for the SPOON ME exhibition we were considering adding some of the scoops and spoons from Medalta’s historic collection of great old objects from our three abandoned ceramic factories.  We have over 7 acres of roofed buildings on our 150 acre historic clay district site here at Medalta… so you can imagine there’s more than a few amazing old tools. Well, we didn’t want leave out this tool treasure trove in favour of the old spoons, so the object for the next international exhibition theme was an easy choice.

We want a photo of you with your favorite tool or tools and a description of how this tool is an integral part of your process... and of course we still want to show off what you can create with these great tools of our trade so submissions will also include up to 5 photos of your work.

Successful applicants will have their tool photograph & description included in the exhibition alongside up to five pieces of their work.  This contemporary work from around the globe featured in TOOL will be displayed alongside a collection of our old tools that were used in the historic ceramics industry at Medalta.  The exhibition will be shared in Medalta’s Yuill galley from September – November 30th 2015, & online via Medalta’s Pinterest pages.  

Juror - Martina Lantin

The GRAND PRIZE: a month long residency at Medalta with accommodation!
Student entries are eligible for Ceramic: Technical and Ceramic: Art & Perception digital subscription!
Purchase prizes for Medalta’s contemporary collection are generously sponsored by Medicine Hat College.
Several of the selected artists will be featured on the Musing About Mud blog.
Awards will be announced at the opening reception.

This year it’s wide open, and will be not only be a diverse exhibition, but a great opportunity for our museum visitors & online community to gain insight into the processes & tools that are a big part of our world behind the finished objects. Good luck to everyone who enters and thank you for your support! We can’t wait to see your submissions.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
Submissions to be completed online from April 1st to June 20th 2015. At www.medalta.org/tool
Entry Fee: $20 Canadian.

IMPORTANT DATES
Applications Deadline: June 20th 2015.
Notification: Begins July 10th 2015.
Accepted Work Due: July 30th 2015.
Exhibition: September –November 2015
Reception: TBA

CONTACT
Any questions regarding this exhibition can be directed to Medalta’s Curator

Jenna Stanton
jenna@medalta.org
Curator of Exhibitions & Collections
Medalta
         

movie day: Antigoni Pantazi Sculptural Ceramics



Antigoni Pantazi is a ceramic artist and teacher. She lives and works in Athens, Greece. Her work is mainly sculptural focused on the human figure.
You can see more of her work at:
www.antipantazi.com
http://mathimatakeramikis.wordpress.com/
http://antigonipantazi.wordpress.com/
www.facebook.com/pages/Ceramics-at-Art-S

Tuesday, 24 March 2015

technical tuesday: Graphic Clay by Jason Bige Burnett - Pre-order on Amazon


For studio artists, production potters, students, educators, and hobbyists who love working with clay, this project-driven guide is an unmatched teaching tool and a fount of information and inspiration. Focusing on various surface processes, and encompassing skills ranging from letterpress and printmaking to drawing and painting, it offers a wealth of techniques for transferring images onto clay vessels. Graphic Clay addresses such topics as staining sculptural work, glazing, brush application, screenprinting patterns on pottery, and slip, drawing, bisque, decal, stencils, and more. Question-and-answer sessions with top artists show how they developed their signature method and personal style-so that you can discover your own!

 





Buy it here! (pre-order to save money!)
Find out more about Jason Burnett here!




Monday, 23 March 2015

help support Centered: Mud and Movement Arts at Taos Clay




Taos Clay Studio is a ceramic art center dedicated to the spread of contemporary clay culture within Taos County, and across the country. We are a community-based organization hosting lectures, workshops, and events to promote art education and hands on learning. We foster an environment of creativity catering to all ages and skill levels.

Founded twelve years ago by Page Patterson Taos Clay has been making an impact on the local art scene since its doors opened. In April of last year the studio underwent a major change when Brandi Jessup our current owner and director purchased the studio from local artist and entrepreneur Logan Wannamaker. Building on twelve years of history and awesome, we are growing at a rate we never could have anticipated!

We firmly believe in the power and importance of arts education and its ability to impact lives. Through memberships and classes, internships and residencies, we build opportunities for lifelong learning and experimentation in the visual arts.

In January of this year we partnered with Travis Webb of Accelerated Kinetic Arts to open a second space dedicated to bringing artists of all media together.

The AKA Studio is a think tank for artists, business people, martial artists, actors, dancers, and creative people of all backgrounds and skills to come together. We create conversation and connect the dots between media to generate both artistic and economic impact!

Find out more, check out some great perks and help support Taos here:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/370215705/centered-mud-and-movement-arts-at-taos-clay?ref=nav_search

www.TaosClay.com

guest post by Julia Krueger - Exhibition Review: Totipotent

--> General view of the exhibition Totipotent with Anteroom, 2015 by Gisele Amantea in the background.
 It’s a daunting position to have your work exhibited just steps away from commanding pieces by artists such as Gisele Amantea (fig. 1) and Clint Neufeld. In fact, you might think that the exhibition Totipotent, on display in Calgary’s Alberta College of Art + Design from February 3 to March 7, 2015, would be eclipsed by the Illingworth Kerr Gallery’s Oh, Canada: Contemporary Art From North North America but for me, that wasn’t the case. Surprisingly enough, after listening to an excellent and engaging lecture by Amélie Proulx (thankfully no reading of an MFA thesis there, and I wholeheartedly recommend that if you have a chance to hear her speak, do so!) followed by the closing of a silent auction, I left ACAD without even setting foot in Oh, Canada. I had planned to do so when I arrived early to the lecture, but instead, I was pulled into all the ceramics department’s activities and subsequently left ACAD feeling content and in need of no further stimulation. It wasn’t until the next day, when I returned to the exhibition, did I remember...Oh, Canada.


-->
General view of the exhibition Totipotent at the Alberta College of Art + Design in Calgary, Alberta.

I can’t think of another time when I have made a second trip to see a student group show. Generally, I find them lacking in curatorial focus just as many Craft Council exhibitions do because in both cases, the content is dictated by a small, often membership-based community. Totipotent is no exception, as it too consists of an array of work executed at varying degrees of success and skill levels, but there is enough success and potency here to warrant a visit. My sister, who joined me during this second viewing, was flummoxed as to whom was all included in this exhibition: was it only the fourth year class or all ceramics majors? From the lecture the previous night, I was able to tell her that the exhibition actually included work from all years, but had I not been in attendance, I would not have known this, and it would have impacted my appreciation of the show. In the future, as a visitor who is not intimately familiar with the current co-hort of students but is an interested alumni, I would like to have more information on whom is included in the exhibition with the help of a small introductory panel/statement or an indication of the student’s year on each tombstone label (yes, I call those labels with the artist’s name, title of the piece etc. “tombstones”). Not to belabour the point but knowing how long a student has studied the discipline at ACAD does impact my criticism of the exhibition because it contextualizes the incongruency, in terms of the quality of work and craftsmanship, found within the exhibition and makes clear that this exhibition is representative of all levels found within the department rather than just the upper, graduating levels. Including some background information would be a welcome addition and would alleviate the confusion and possible premature dismissal of specific pieces and the show in general.

The title of the exhibition is telling and hints at the metaphorical strength of Totipotent as a physical manifestation of the autonomous art form of ceramics.* According to Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, a totipotent cell is “capable of differentiating into a large variety of cells.” The “organism” (which in this case is ceramics and more specifically the ceramics department at ACAD) is made of various cells (the approaches found within the discipline), and the students at this point, are in various states of discovery and experimentation with the material. They are the totipotent cells.

--> Emily Stone, Prelude in E Minor, porcelaneous stoneware.

To sum up this review, I will highlight the work of four students whose contributions to Totipotent embody the strengths of ACAD’s ceramics department and whose states of totipotency may be nearing an end. Led by functionalists such as Katrina Chaytor and Martina Lantin and a curriculum based on a solid foundation of hand building and wheel throwing, ACAD has consistently produced strong functional potters. Emily Stone continues this tradition with Prelude in E Minor, an elegant assemblage of wheel-thrown flower vases that have been meticulously altered by hand. It was refreshing to see the vases put to work, with flowers gracefully inserted into the patterned ceramic lattice. I look forward to seeing how Stone will continue to address the neutering of the vase form within an exhibition setting.


--> Adam Lefebvre, Firebox Tray, wood fired stoneware and soda fired stoneware.


While Stone’s glaze pallet is reminiscent of the same ones I used when studying in the department, the work of Adam T. Lefebvre is a dramatic departure. Firebox Tray is elemental to the core. Formally, Lefebvre has distilled the work down to basic, elemental potted forms: vessel and tray. The atmospheric firing techniques employed to create this work speak to the powerful elemental forces on earth: climate and time. Lefebvre’s research into these sublime themes aligns his work with other Canadian Prairie ceramists such as John Chalke and Martin Tagseth who have successfully made tangible the wonders found within this part of Canada. Lefebvre is in good company, and I eagerly anticipate his contribution to the field as he continues to develop his own aesthetic beyond the brown and round atmospheric-fired pot.



--> Chase Key, When it all gets Just a Bit too Heavy, clay, wood ash, tree, paper and ink.

The work of Chase Key also got me thinking back to my Canadian ceramics history lessons. With David Gilhooly’s 1979 Bread Wall located in a government building in downtown Calgary and the impact he had on Saskatchewan ceramics, it is not surprising that when I came upon Key’s When it all gets Just a Bit too Heavy, I smiled in remembrance of Gilhooly. Key’s piled-too-high, precarious aesthetic and use of humour is reminiscent of Gilhooly’s food sculptures and large frog busts with various things piled atop their heads such as Well Balanced Fertility Goddess, 1972.

--> Kurt Wiedemann, From Polley Shores, ceramic and electronics


Another mixed media sculptural highlight, with a strong message, was From Polley Shores by Kurt Wiedemann. In this case, the didactic panel was welcome as the lighting was not dramatic enough for me to immediately catch the importance of the sensor driven LED lights. However, considering the space the organizers had (a long narrow hallway) they did a fine job of utilizing various levels and some spotlighting. The incorporation of sensors in Wiedemann’s piece is thanks to the ceramic department’s, and more specifically faculty member Greg Payce’s, pushing of the material-specific boundaries of the discipline. What makes this piece so interesting to me is how Wiedemann has harnessed both the beauty and horror of glaze. The glossy, wet-looking pools of colour draw me in, and my attention is focused even more with the strategic lighting. However, underneath it all is the ironic fact that the materials used to make this piece, which addresses a mining disaster, were mined as well—something that is often left unsaid in ceramics. Wiedemann doesn’t need to overtly say it here....I got it.


--> Kurt Wiedemann, From Polley Shores, ceramic and electronics

Over the years, I have attended a number of exhibitions by the ceramics department at ACAD, and more often than not, they do not disappoint. This year however, the pieces listed above, along with a number of other pieces that I would have liked to discuss but there is just not enough space, got me thinking and moved me in ways that I expected to be moved when experiencing the work of the more mature artists in Oh, Canada. With students like these and a strong department where all the “cells” of ceramics are welcome and fostered, things are looking good for the future of ceramics in Alberta.

*It came to my attention after a discussion with Chaytor, that the title of the exhibition was also inspired by the book The Intangibilities of Form by John Roberts. 
 Find out more about today's guest blogger Julia Krueger here and here.
*images by Julia and Yolanda Krueger